Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest

Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest Details

From Nate Powell, the National Book Award–winning artist of March, a collection of graphic nonfiction essays about living in a new era of necessary protest

In seven interwoven comics essays, author and graphic novelist Nate Powell addresses living in an era of what he calls “necessary protest.” Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest is Powell’s reflection on witnessing the collapse of discourse in real time while drawing the award-winning trilogy March, written by Congressman John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, this generation’s preeminent historical account of nonviolent revolution in the civil rights movement. Powell highlights both the danger of normalized paramilitary presence symbols in consumer pop culture, and the roles we play individually as we interact with our communities, families, and society at large.
Each essay tracks Powell’s journey from the night of the election—promising his four-year-old daughter that Trump will never win, to the reality of the authoritarian presidency, protesting the administration’s policies, and navigating the complications of teaching his children how to raise their own voices in a world that is becoming increasingly dangerous and more and more polarized. While six of the seven essays are new, unpublished work, Powell has also included “About Face,” a comics essay first published by Popula Online that swiftly went viral and inspired him to expand his work on Save It for Later. The seventh and final essay will contextualize the myriad events of 2020 with the previous four years—from the COVID-19 pandemic to global protests in the wake of George Floyd’s murder to the 2020 presidential election itself—highlighting both the consistencies and inversions of widely shared experiences and observations amidst a massive social upheaval.
As Powell moves between subjective and objective experiences raising his children—depicted in their childhood innocence as imaginary anthropomorphic animals—he reveals the electrifying sense of trust and connection with neighbors and strangers in protest. He also explores how to equip young people with tools to best make their own noise as they grow up and help shape the direction and future of this country.
 

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Title:Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest
ISBN:9781419749124
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    Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest Reviews

  • Alexander Peterhans

    I don't need to tell you 2020 is a dumpster fire. You're reading this, I think it's safe to assume you're alive, you've been living through it (touch wood, 2020 is still going when I write this).This ...

  • Bandit

    I’m mainly reading all these serious graphic novels, because of our library’s stubborn refusal to get the ones I’m more into. Which is to say my comic book tastes are more conventional, somethin...

  • Joy

    I was so excited to have the opportunity to get a first look at the newest work by the creator of March. The illustrations are as captivating and nuanced as one would expect. At times, truth and poign...

  • Lindsey Lewis

    Save It For Later is a graphic memoir of essays that address how we teach our children about injustice, inequity, and all the other things messed up about the world we are raising them in. It is writt...

  • Charlotte Jones

    *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Nate Powell’s ‘March’ has been on my radar for a few years now but this is the first of his works that ...

  • Adam Shields

    Summary: A memoir of parenting and activism over the past five years.Nate Powell is best known as the March Trilogy artist, a collaboration with John Lewis to tell the story of his early years as a Ci...

  • S.

    I thank Abrams Books for sending me this free ARC.TW: fascists; Nazi, fascist, and Confederate symbols and people; depression, anxiety, panic attacks This graphic novel choked me up. At John Lewis'...

  • Sara

    Read more graphic novel reviews at The Graphic Library.This collection of graphic essays presents Nate Powell as he tackles with the election of 2016, difficult conversations he has with his young da...

  • Michael

    Powell's art is just as impactful here as it is in the March trilogy, and no one would accuse this graphic essay collection of lacking earnestness. Some readers might accuse it of preaching to the cho...

  • Raymond

    This is a powerful collection of seven essays in graphic novel format written and illustrated by Nate Powell who illustrated the March trilogy by the late Congressman John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. In S...