Serving the Servant: Remembering Kurt Cobain

Serving the Servant: Remembering Kurt Cobain Review

On the twenty-fifth anniversary of Kurt Cobain’s death comes a new perspective on one of the most compelling icons of our time

In early 1991, top music manager Danny Goldberg agreed to take on Nirvana, a critically acclaimed new band from the underground music scene in Seattle. He had no idea that the band’s leader, Kurt Cobain, would become a pop-culture icon with a legacy arguably at the level of that of John Lennon, Michael Jackson, or Elvis Presley. Danny worked with Kurt from 1990 to 1994, the most impactful period of Kurt’s life. This key time saw the stratospheric success of Nevermind, which turned Nirvana into the most successful rock band in the world and made punk and grunge household terms; Kurt’s meeting and marriage to the brilliant but mercurial Courtney Love and their relationship that became a lightning rod for critics; the birth of their daughter, Frances Bean; and, finally, Kurt’s public struggles with addiction, which ended in a devastating suicide that would alter the course of rock history. Throughout, Danny stood by Kurt’s side as manager, and close friend.

Drawing on Goldberg’s own memories of Kurt, files that previously have not been made public, and interviews with, among others, Kurt’s close family, friends, and former bandmates, Serving the Servants sheds an entirely new light on these critical years. Casting aside the common obsession with the angst and depression that seemingly drove Kurt, Serving the Servants is an exploration of his brilliance in every aspect of rock and roll, his compassion, his ambition, and the legacy he wrought—one that has lasted decades longer than his career did. Danny Goldberg explores what it is about Kurt Cobain that still resonates today, even with a generation who wasn’t alive until after Kurt’s death. In the process, he provides a portrait of an icon unlike any that has come before.

Title:Serving the Servant: Remembering Kurt Cobain

    Serving the Servant: Remembering Kurt Cobain Reviews

  • Nick Younker

    Goldberg reminds us that massive success for an artist isn't the only thing that goes down as legend. It's the view from just outside, that person breathing fog rings on a window and sucking them away...

  • Kristin

    Serving the Servant by Danny Goldberg is a first-hand account on the Seattle grunge movement that catapulted a contemplative Kurt Cobain into superstardom. And, suicide. Deeply damaged by his meteoric...

  • britt_brooke

    I honestly can’t believe it’s been 25 years since Cobain’s death. I was 12, and can remember my older brother’s utter devastation. Cobain’s friend and former manager has penned an intimate l...

  • Tony

    It had potential..The first 2/3 read like a Wikipedia page. I suspect John Silva would be able to fill in many of blanks encountered here. I grew tired of reading other people’s accounts, largely al...

  • Jenny (Bookbookowl)

    Many thanks to Hachette Australia for providing me with a copy of Serving the Servant, in exchange for an honest review.I was fifteen years old when Kurt Cobain died.  I still remember exactly where ...

  • Bekki

    there were some factual errors, but in all, i will always appreciate people with maturity who look at kurt's death for what it was, and who don't vilify courtney love. there might be a lot of informat...

  • stargirl

    Anytime I get to read something about Kurt - I feel totally blessed to even have any access to what he was like (artistically, his work ethic, the passion and empathy for people around him, the way he...

  • Becky

    Brought back some good memories of my time in Pittsburgh PA. Can't believe how old I am! I was in my 20s when Nirvana came on the scene, and I don't really know much about them. I have ambivalent feel...

  • Bradley Valentine

    I don't know if this is the best book you'll read concerning either the collective Nirvana group/experience or of just Kurt Cobain (who is more the focus here than his iconic 90s rock hand). However I...

  • Alvaro Zinos-Amaro

    Fascinating account, which I highly recommend to anyone interested in the history of 90s rock music or pop culture and iconography and art in general. I could write 1,000 words of praise, discussing a...